Philippines

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C-H-O-R-V-A

Published March 26, 2012 by The OC

And you ask, what does chorva mean?

Chorva is a word used by Filipinos which does not exactly mean anything. It is used as a filler for a word which is at the tip of the tongue, a word that one cannot give an exact term for, a word which is forgotten at the moment of saying it, or for a word for something one isn’t familiar or has no idea of.

It is made popular by gay Filipinos who uses it in their language often and just came to influence others by their flowery vocabulary. Basically, “chorva” can be found in the dictionary of gays. It is believed that this word came from the Greek word “cheorvamus” which means “for lack of the right word to say or in place of something you want to express but cannot be put into words” according to the urban dictionary online.

Chorva can be compared to the neutral colors, black and white, for its practicality of usage at any time. Chorva is the same with ek-ek, echos, chuvaness, and eklabuh.

Kahit ano pang chorva ang pagdaanan natin, ‘wag tayong susuko”

(translation: “Whatever chorva we go through, let’s not give up.”)

-The OC

And So I Was Told

Published March 26, 2012 by The OC

Folk tales are defined as stories handed down to us through oral tradition which means it has been passed to us because of continuous telling and listening. Folk tales are different from fairy tales. Fairy tales, according to Wikipedia, involves characters like fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, dwarves, giants, mermaids, or gnomes while Folk tales, specifically Filipino folktales involve characters like tikbalang, nuno sa punso, manananggal, aswang, engkanto, tiyanak, kapre and diwata.

Characters in Filipino folktales often are misinterpreted or at least being identified as something else. The Filipino’s kapre should not be compared or called as a giant. A kapre is a creäture that lives as a tree demon that is hairy and is smoking a tobacco. Diwatas are not fairies and so as tiyanak is not a goblin. There is much difference between these creatures compared to those monsters of the western world. Our culture is rich in its own way which cannot be compared to any other.

Growing up, my grandmother would always tell me folk tales and such. Though it is prevalent in our country, it is not worldly “accepted” as compared to fairy tales. Having these stories go with me from being a kid to a teenager, I can say that it has helped me a lot with the way I act and think. Folk tales may not always have the moral lessons and happy endings, but in the midst of the story, you get to learn some things.

Stories about the diwatas, dwendes and engkantos taught me not to mess with nature and take care of it or else, I can end up messing their home and have me cursed or such. Stories about the kapres, white ladies, and manananggals made me think twice about lurking around at night. These tales are mostly scary and creepy but it implies the so-called lessons just in a different way. This is how our ancestors have their beliefs put in action and be passed on to the next generation.

It’s More Fun in The Philippines! ♥

Published January 13, 2012 by The OC

I think a lot of you have already heard about this “It’s more fun in the Philippines thing.” Well, I’m giving you pictures I found about the latest tourism strategy of the Department of Tourism! HAHA. Some of these are just made by those with creative minds, if you know what I mean. ;

So, here it is!

The Banawe Rice Terraces

Chocolate Hills

Hundred Islands

Mayon Volcano

Eating with bare hands

 

Ati-Atihan

Bayanihan

 

Jeepney

Lechong Baboy

New 500 Peso Bill

Cebu Dancing Inmates

Halo-Halo

Tapsilog

Dirty Ice Cream

Fish Balls, Squid Balls, Kikiam

Chocnut

GMA's Eat Bulaga Sugod Bahay Gang

This is pretty much like an album thingy. :)) But I hoped you enjoyed and come visit the Philippines sometime! Don’t worry, people here sure are friendly! See you soon! ♥

xx ,

The OC

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